Sardarapat Memorial - Etchmiadzin Cathedral - Saint Gayane Church - Saint Hripsime Church - Zvartnots Cathedral

Daily tour, one day trip: excursion to Sardarapat Memorial - Etchmiadzin Cathedral - Saint Gayane Church - Saint Hripsime Church - Zvartnots Cathedral

 

Sardarapat Memorial is a symbol of pride and survival, the Memorial marks the place of Armenia's successful last-ditch effort to save the nation from obliteration at the hands of the Turks in the Battle of Sardarapat on May 22–26, 1918.

The entrance is flanked by huge winged oxen made of red tufa. A flight of steps leads to a square from which a 26-metre-high bell to rises. The beautiful trellis structure with its twelve bells can be seen from afar. The bells ring every year on the day of the historic victory. The monument is guarded by massive ancient style Armenian-winged lions, and is flanked by a memorial garden for Karabakh (Arstakh) martyrs.

On the grounds of the historic battle one can today visit the Sardarapat Ethnography and Liberation Movement History Museum adjacent to the outdoor monument.

Designed in the shape of a medieval Armenian castle by architect Rafael Israelyan, the museum was opened in 1978.

Collection of Armenia Museum of Ethnography and the national liberation movement contains 70 thousand sets.

 

Echmiadzin or Vagharshapat is a city in the Armavir region of Armenia, one of the most significant cultural and religious centers of the country.

Etchmiadzin Cathedral is the mother church of the Armenian Apostolic Church, located in the city of Vagharshapat (Etchmiadzin). According to most scholars it was the first cathedral built in ancient Armenia, and is often considered the oldest cathedral in the world.

The original church was built in the early fourth century - between 301 and 303 according to tradition-by Armenia's patron saint Gregory the Illuminator, following the adoption of Christianity as a state religion by King Tiridates III. It was built over a pagan temple, symbolizing the conversion from paganism to Christianity. The core of the current building was built in 483/4 by Vahan Mamikonian after the cathedral was severely damaged in a Persian invasion. From its foundation until the second half of the fifth century, Etchmiadzin was the seat of the Catholicos, the supreme head of the Armenian Church.

 

The Church of Saint Gayane is a 7th-century church, the religious center of Armenia. In 2000, Saint Gayane Church was listed in the UNESCO World Heritage Sites along with historical churches of Vagharshapat. It is located within walking distance from the Etchmiadzin Cathedral. St. Gayane was built by Catholicos Ezra I in the year 630. Its design has remained unchanged despite partial renovations of the dome and some ceilings in 1652.

Gayane was the name of an abbess who was martyred with other nuns by Tiridates III of Armenia in the year 301, and subsequently made a saint of the Armenian Apostolic Church.

 

Saint Hripsime Church was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site along with other nearby churches, including Etchmiadzin Cathedral, Armenia's mother church, in 2000. It is one of the oldest surviving churches in the country. The current structure was completed in 618 AD. It is known for its fine Armenian-style architecture of the classical period, which has influenced many other Armenian churches since.

Hripsime, along with the abbess Gayane and thirty-two unnamed nuns, are traditionally considered the first Christian martyrs in Armenia's history. They were persecuted, tortured, and eventually killed by king Tiridates III of Armenia. According to the chronicler Agathangelos, after conversion to Christianity in 301, Tiridates and Gregory the Illuminator built a martyrium dedicated to Hripsime at the location of her martyrdom, which was half buried underground. Excavations around the church have uncovered remains of several tortured women buried in early Christian manner. In 395 Patriarch Sahak Partev (Isaac the Parthian) rebuilt or built a new martyrium, which had been destroyed by the Shapur II of the Sasanian Empire in the 360s.

 

Zvartnots Cathedral is a 7th-century centrally planned aisled tetraconch type Armenian cathedral built by the order of Catholicos Nerses the Builder from 643-652. Now in ruins, it is located at the edge of the city of Vagharshapat (Etchmiadzin) in Armavir Province of Armenia.

Dedicated to St. Gregory, it was located at the place where a meeting between King Trdat III and Gregory the Illuminator was supposed to have taken place. According to the medieval Armenian historian Movses Kaghankatvatsi, the cathedral was consecrated in 652.

Zvartnots remained standing until the end of the tenth century, but historical sources are silent as to the cause of its collapse.

Duration: 5 hours

Price of group and individual excursions

(The price is written on the transportation regardless the number of the participents)

 

Price without a guide
1-3 pers. 4-6 pers. up to 7 pers.
60 USD
75 USD
on request
Price with a guide
1-3 pers. 4-6 pers. up to 7 pers.
100 USD 115 USD on request
 
The price does not include:
  • entrance tickets to the historical and cultural centers;

   

  • (+374 91) 01 56 60

 

 

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